Nursing Ethics

Passion (Why Am I Here?)

The ultimate reason lies in my inner desire to serve mankind, to do the most honorable duty of taking care of the sick according to my ability, to make my patients feel comfortable even in the time of adversity by giving them hope when necessary and, at the same time, being realistic about their conditions.

Motivation (What Moves Me)

My heart is rooted to the cause of human life and the mystery that surrounds it even when it is engulfed by limitations of nature. My desire is always to do my best to preserve life by making sure I do not jeopardize its foundations in thoughts or practice. In the same measure, I will try to hold the dignity of life even when it is slipping from my grasp.

Loyalty (Whom do I Serve)

My loyalty stretches from my patients, family and society at large. It is all those people who are connected to the patients directly or indirectly. My commitment also extends to upholding confidentiality of my patients and that of their family members. Finally, I am also obligated to honor my patients’ wishes as long as they do not contradict with my primary duties (Bandsman & Bandman, 2002).

Personal, Cultural and Spiritual Values and Contributions to Philosophy of Nursing

In caring for the sick, some factors come in to play which definitely influence our actions. Our personal core values always play an important role in influencing our duties. It is under these values that we make our personal pledges, which we commit ourselves to adhere to in the course of our duties. Understanding the culture of the patient is very crucial in execution of our duties. This is due to the fact that the core duty of the nurses is top care for the patients irrespective of their conditions. It is therefore logical to respect their culture for the sake of being in touch with their needs or the family members.

Finally, although tremendous improvements have been made in the world of medicine, our shortcomings are always manifested as we always fall short of treating various terminal diseases. As health practitioners, we always grapple with these shortcomings, and in most cases the divinity always comes to play in the part of health workers, patient or family members. This happens especially when we know we cannot deal with a certain ailment and death is inevitable. The spiritual world in most cases comes in to fill the gaps left by our shortcomings by the virtue of being human beings (Thompson, 2006).

Define Values Morals and Ethics Values in the Context of Nursing

Values are deep beliefs of what is actually right or appropriate. Values are constant over a certain period and accumulate over through interactions with teachers, religious figures, parents or any other influence. Our values are sometimes so embedded in our life that they appear to be subconscious and are only evident when something arises. It is in that case that we generally do not remember we have them in our life or they simply affect our decision making. It is under these pillars that we entrenched ethics such as the prevention of diseases, reducing of patients’ suffering through medication or simply comforting them. Nursing profession dictates we uphold life with dignity and we do everything within our power to preserve it. Unfortunately, some instances bring ethic and morals to focus in case of terminal illness. This is manifested iIn the case of palliative care for terminally ill, which generally deals with relieving pain or simply reducing patients’ suffering. In some cases, patients may interfere with the nurse’s duties by deciding not to take a certain medication or therapy. This becomes a dilemma between trying to help patients and avoiding their sufferings. Sometimes, patients may decide to spend their last moments with their family rather than go through chemotherapy or other treatments (Karthaus, 2000).

Ethical and Moral Dilemmas I May Face in Health Care Field.

In my medical field, I anticipate to face challenges that will directly deal with my ethical and moral values. This can be attributed to the fact that my culture and religion over the years has shaped me to believe that life is noble and we should always endeavor to preserve it. It is embedded in the ethics that I should always make sure that my actions should be guided by trying to heal and reduce suffering. It will always be normal for me due to my personal convictions that I will naturally advocate for preserving life more than trying to avoid suffering of patients. I know in my field my patients will come from different backgrounds. This means that their personal values will be different from mine, and we may have different ways of doing things based on our morals.

Some people value quality life more than life itself, while I normally value life under any circumstances. In my field, I will be required to listen to my patients’ convictions and respect their beliefs. In a scenario where avoiding suffering may be required, letting a patient give up on medication or not will be one of my biggest dilemmas (Portenoy & Bruera, 2003).

Conclusion

In health care field, we actually deal with human beings, and that means that we lack a constant approach of dealing with different issues that arise. This can be attributed to the fact that human beings are generally different, and they will deal with some scenarios differently. Although we have codes of ethics, which we will always adhere to, sometimes this ethics will be challenged by the same patients. For example, some patients might object the methods that we think will alleviate their suffering, which is something that generally affects our principles but, at the same time, brings satisfaction to patients and family members.